“Baile Gitano” poem / “Milonga del angel” score – Astor Piazzolla

BAILE GITANO

Swirls

upon your feet

among the

sweet-smelling turns

grass on your

skirt. Swollen womb

gipsy brings

the unripe lemon

in your love shout,

violent instinct

who lacerated

your bloody slashes.

So, come on!

Fearless…

Sat in the saddle

of your horse

cross the meseta.

Shake your

Dark hair

(and violet too) head

And during a sad dance

Walk out of your shames.

You are not a wife,

Andalusian mountains Petenera:

so, unveil your breast,

stained chestnut

by tears from the moon.

Abandoned

as two hidden lovers,

frayed and burnt passion

into the lost look

of a vermilion tango,

in a saffron sunset.

Half-shut lips,

tinged with the

bright waters warmth

among the toes

of your white feet;

gipsy of a violent love

among the sharp thorns

of a rose and

the swirl of a sword…

Swirl in your skirt,

Be your skin brownish again

burnt of cruel passion.

Oh! Andalusian mountains gipsy!

While your blood

Dances in your veins

you hug the

overwhelming rhythm

of a chant

in front of waterfalls:

exhaled brightness rays

overrun you,

love pilgrim

for a sad mirror song.

If you are smiling

It will be for

the soul wings,

as you lift up

among heavenly clouds.

Oh! Andalusian mountains Gipsy!

The “Milonga of an angel”, that’s what I propose you this week. An enchanting alternative to tango, a danceable song with a slower rhythm, spread in south America, always by Astor Piazzolla.

Rushing and at the same time elegant, this songs fits very well the piano sound…no doubt a way to warm these cold days of February, imagining to be on the riverside of the Rio de la Plata, hearing in the distance the notes of an overwhelming Milonga!

The piano score is entitled “Milonga del Angel” and you can download it here for free!

One thought on ““Baile Gitano” poem / “Milonga del angel” score – Astor Piazzolla

  1. Fizzy Devlin

    Hi! I play this song on the piano, but i’m looking for a version for the violin (possibly even for two violins, but otherwise for violin and piano). Would you know where to look?

    Thanks!

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